HUBUD
Knife
DRILL

Edged Weapon Flow Drills
hubud flow drill

HUBUD
Knife
DRILL

Edged Weapon
Flow Drills

KNIFE DRILLS

Hubud Flow Drills

KNIFE DRILLS

HUBUD flow drill

FULL BOX DRILL

Hubud is a partner-based drill that allows each training partner to cycle through a cyclical flow of defensive and offensive tactics.  Those unaware of the tactical benefits of the Hubud flow drill will liken it to katas or forms from traditional martial arts.  However, unlike katas and forms, Hubud can be adapted in tactically creative ways that teach students realistic responses to attacks, dynamic movement patterns and countervailing force tactics.

Hubud, short for Hubud Lubud, is a Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) close quarters flow drill that means "to tie and untie".   The drill is composed of three main elements: Receive, Redirect and Return.  To break it down further I emphasize a control element following the redirect to ensure we don't leave ourselves open for an attack while returning or feeding our partner.   

Receive— When receiving the incoming attack we must block (to protect from taking damage) while simultaneously looking to redirect (to reduce impact and transfer energy away).  Blocking isn't a static hard block, rather an initial contact defense with an immediate redirect.

Redirect— Upon initial contact (blocking) the most important step is to redirect the incoming attack energy to improve our position while weakening our opponents.  I typically refer to this as a "pass".  I want to pass the attacking limb by wedging my forearm between my blocking arm and the opponent's attacking arm. 

Control— After the redirecting and passing the opponent's attacking limb across their midline I want to control that arm from the outside with a C-clamp grip behind the elbow.  Make sure to keep the thumb up in your C-clamp grip to ensure they are not able to easily counter you. 

Return— To keep the Hubud drill flowing dynamically I need to feed my opponent an attack so they can run through the same Receive—Redirect—Control portion of the drill.  Aside from the drill, it is wise to learn how to immediately counterattack an opponent after you have successfully defended an initial attack.

Keep in mind this is a drill for specific skill development.  It's not fighting or sparring.  In a realistic scenario both you and your opponent will be moving dynamically and attacking with intent. The Hubud Flow Drill allows you to train lines of attack, lines of defense and tactical control of an opponent. From the Hubud you can achieve any of the three control positions: Arm Lock, Swim Through or Wrist Lock. Often your opponent will give you one of these in response to pain or pressure you apply in the drill. Each of the control positions provide a pain response and takedown, depending on your application of the technique.


Video Sections:
0:17  Hubud: Basics
1:52  Hubud Progressions: Armbar
3:09  Hubud Progressions: Swim Through
5:24  Hubud Progressions: Wrist Lock
6:53  Hubud: Final Details
Hubud is a partner-based drill that allows each training partner to cycle through a cyclical flow of defensive and offensive tactics.  Those unaware of the tactical benefits of the Hubud flow drill will liken it to katas or forms from traditional martial arts.  However, unlike katas and forms, Hubud can be adapted in tactically creative ways that teach students realistic responses to attacks, dynamic movement patterns and countervailing force tactics.

Hubud, short for Hubud Lubud, is a Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) close quarters flow drill that means "to tie and untie".   The drill is composed of three main elements: Receive, Redirect and Return.  To break it down further I emphasize a control element following the redirect to ensure we don't leave ourselves open for an attack while returning or feeding our partner.   

Receive— When receiving the incoming attack we must block (to protect from taking damage) while simultaneously looking to redirect (to reduce impact and transfer energy away).  Blocking isn't a static hard block, rather an initial contact defense with an immediate redirect.

Redirect— Upon initial contact (blocking) the most important step is to redirect the incoming attack energy to improve our position while weakening our opponents.  I typically refer to this as a "pass".  I want to pass the attacking limb by wedging my forearm between my blocking arm and the opponent's attacking arm. 

Control— After the redirecting and passing the opponent's attacking limb across their midline I want to control that arm from the outside with a C-clamp grip behind the elbow.  Make sure to keep the thumb up in your C-clamp grip to ensure they are not able to easily counter you. 

Return— To keep the Hubud drill flowing dynamically I need to feed my opponent an attack so they can run through the same Receive—Redirect—Control portion of the drill.  Aside from the drill, it is wise to learn how to immediately counterattack an opponent after you have successfully defended an initial attack.

Keep in mind this is a drill for specific skill development.  It's not fighting or sparring.  In a realistic scenario both you and your opponent will be moving dynamically and attacking with intent. The Hubud Flow Drill allows you to train lines of attack, lines of defense and tactical control of an opponent. From the Hubud you can achieve any of the three control positions: Arm Lock, Swim Through or Wrist Lock. Often your opponent will give you one of these in response to pain or pressure you apply in the drill. Each of the control positions provide a pain response and takedown, depending on your application of the technique.


Video Sections:
0:17  Hubud: Basics
1:52  Hubud Progressions: Armbar
3:09  Hubud Progressions: Swim Through
5:24  Hubud Progressions: Wrist Lock
6:53  Hubud: Final Details
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